Potestas Essendi

A Virtual Space for Thoughts on the Middle Ages, by Nicola Polloni

Multimedia

Dissemination and scientific popularisation play a pivotal role in academia: research and research products need to be spread outside the ‘Ivory Tower’ in order to contribute to the social discussion and elaboration of philosophical, historical, and scientific themes, some of which – such as the cross-cultural exchange of knowledge among Christians, Jews, and Muslims – are of the utmost importance in our days. 


Translating Experience:
Medieval Encounters with Nature, Self, and God

KATJA KRAUSE & NICOLA POLLONI (Durham University): ‘The Light of Nature? No “Experience” in the Middle Ages!’


THERESE CORY (Notre Dame University): ‘Aquinas on Experience and Its Scope’


DAVID CORY (Notre Dame University): ‘The “obscure and hidden” work of the vegetal soul in Thomas Aquinas’


CELIA LOPEZ (Universidade do Porto): ‘Experience and Self-Knowledge in Petrus Hispanus’s Theory of the Soul’


JON MCGINNIS (University of Missouri – St Louis): ‘A Matter of Priorities: Avicenna’s Solution to Meno’s Paradox and Its implications for the Sciences’


NICHOLAS OSCHMAN (Marquette University): ‘Translating Truth into Images in al-Fārābī’s Polis’


FEDERICO DAL BO (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona): ‘The “Sacrifice of Isaac” as God’s Self-Testing in the XIII Century Spanish Kabbalah’ 


STEVEN HARVEY (Bar-Ilan University): ‘The Place of Observation and Experience in the Quest for True Knowledge among Jewish Aristotelians in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries’


JOSÉ HIGUERA RUBIO (Universidade do Porto): ‘Ars experimentalis: Experience in Demonstrative and Productive Disciplines’


MÁRIO CORREIA (Universidade do Porto): ‘Experience and Natural Philosophy in Italian Renaissance Scholasticism: Gomes of Lisbon’s Scotistic Response to Nicoletto Vernia’


The Penetration of Arabic Philosophy
into the Latin Philosophical Tradition (1162-1215)

N. POLLONI, The Toledan Translation Movement

First video-lecture of the research seminar The Penetration of Arabic Philosophy into the Latin Philosophical Tradition (1162-1215), organised by the Aquinas and ‘the Arabs’ International Working Group (AAIWG)


N. POLLONIDominicus Gundissalinus: Metaphysics and Cosmology

Second video-lecture of the research seminar The Penetration of Arabic Philosophy into the Latin Philosophical Tradition (1162-1215), organised by the Aquinas and ‘the Arabs’ International Working Group (AAIWG)


N. POLLONIGundissalinus’s Psychological Reflection

Third video-lecture of the research seminar The Penetration of Arabic Philosophy into the Latin Philosophical Tradition (1162-1215), organised by the Aquinas and ‘the Arabs’ International Working Group (AAIWG)


N. POLLONIAttempting an ‘Epistemological Revolution’: Gundissalinus’s De divisione philosophiae

Fourth video-lecture of the research seminar The Penetration of Arabic Philosophy into the Latin Philosophical Tradition (1162-1215), organised by the Aquinas and ‘the Arabs’ International Working Group (AAIWG)


N. POLLONITheoretical Enthusiasm and Doctrinal Condemnation: 1181-1215

Fifth and final video-lecture of the research seminar The Penetration of Arabic Philosophy into the Latin Philosophical Tradition (1162-1215), organised by the Aquinas and ‘the Arabs’ International Working Group (AAIWG)


Medieval Moments

N. POLLONI, Gundissalinus, Avicenna, and the Road to Paris

Lecture given at Marquette University, Milwaukee (WI), in November 2016. Together with two further, anonymous works,  the De causis primis et secundis and the Book on the Peregrinations of the Soul in the Afterlife, Gundissalinus’s writings mark the theoretical and even material path that will lead to the great receptions and criticisms of Avicenna and the other ‘Arabs’ in Paris and Oxford during the thirteenth century and beyond—from John Blund to Albert of Cologne, Thomas Aquinas, Roger Bacon, and Duns Scotus. I will try to cast some light on this very first stage of ‘theoretical appropriation’ of Avicenna’s doctrines in the Latin West, analysing how Avicenna’s doctrines have been accepted or rejected by Gundissalinus and the two anonymous authors of the De causis primis et secundis and the Book on the Peregrinations of the Soul in the Afterlife, and pointing out, in particular, the role played by other translations produced in Toledo on Avicenna’s philosophical reception.

Link to the video


Filosofia Medieval:
em curso e em toda a extensão 

Apresentação de livros – Porto, 12 de janeiro de 2017